Tips to Limit Preschooler’s Screen Time

The exciting nature of screen time can trigger the release of dopamine, a feel-good neurotransmitter that makes us associate screens with pleasure and therefore something we want to spend more time with. When the game stops, so does dopamine release and for some individuals this can result in irritability. 

Time spent in front of a screen is also time your kids are not spending engaged in other activities, many of which minimize behavior problems. 

Kids with more than two hours a day of screen time by the age of 5 are almost eight times more likely to meet the criteria for ADD/ADHD than youngsters who spend less than 30 minutes a day looking at a screen, according to a 2019 Canadian study in Plos One

The next time you’re tempted to use screen time as a sort of babysitter, think twice. You could be setting up your child for a lifetime of struggle. It’s best to limit your preschooler’s screen time to no more than 30 minutes a day. Here are three ways to limit your preschooler’s screen time. 

 1. Use parental controls. 

Tablets and smartphones come equipped with control options that allow parents to monitor and limit screen time. 

2. Set and enforce screen rules. 

No screens at the dinner table. No screens in the car. No screens before bedtime. Whatever rules you set, be sure to enforce them. This will help preschoolers develop a healthier relationship with their tech gadgets. 

3. Encourage physical activity. 

Take your child to the park, swimming pool, or activity center or sign them up for group sports so they can burn off energy while having fun and learning new skills. Exercise increases blood flow to all parts of the body, including the brain, and it boosts focus and attention. Kids who spent at least two hours a week playing organized sports were less likely to have behavioral issues. When ADD patients play sports, such as basketball, which involves intense aerobic exercise, they tend to do better in school. 

Coach Benjamin Mizrahi. Educator. Learning Specialist. Family Coach. Father. Husband.   

More articles on www.MrMizrahi.blog  

Learn to write the Alphabet

A collection of Alphabet mazes featuring ASL hand signs along with uppercase and lowercase letter practice. These mazes are great for children learning basic hand signs, and provide an opportunity to practice small motor control and dexterity.  Handwriting practice for both uppercase and lowercase letters is provided below.

Learn to write the letter A
Learn to write the letter B
Learn to write the letter C
Learn to write the letter D
Learn to write the letter E
Learn to write the letter F
Learn to write the letter G
Learn to write the letter H
Learn to write the letter I
Learn to write the letter J
Learn to write the letter K
Learn to write the letter L
Learn to write the letter M
Learn to write the letter N
Learn to write the letter O
Learn to write the letter P
Learn to write the letter Q
Learn to write the letter R
Learn to write the letter S
Learn to write the letter T
Learn to write the letter U
Learn to write the letter V
Learn to write the letter W
Learn to write the letter X
Learn to write the letter Y
Learn to write the letter Z

 

Source can be found here.

Alphabet Warm Up Work

This is a collection of warm-up worksheets you can print for your young children.  Warm-up sheets provide children with pre-writting practice as well as exercise of small motor control to build dexterity.  These are great when used as warm-ups to daily work, or just as extra practice or laminate and use with a dry erase marker for repeated use in a classroom setting.

A simple pre-handwriting worksheet for children to trace. Starting with the lowercase letter children follow the line to the uppercase letter. Dyslexia friendly font used.

Download below:

Click here for ABC Warm Up Spreadsheet 1
Click here for ABC Warm Up Spreadsheet 2
Click here for ABC Warm Up Spreadsheet 3
Click here for ABC Warm Up Spreadsheet 4

Source can be found here.

Beginning Subtraction

In this lesson on numbers 0 to 10, kids will be taught rote count sequence and numeral recognition. The lesson has been designed to introduce numbers in a scaffolded way, by first starting with a slow-paced numeral recognition exercise and progressing to a faster pace as the lesson continues. This technique helps build a stronger foundation of math skills.

To download the handout, click here: Sutraction Handout

Preschool Math Substraction

Preschool Math: Take Away the Sea Creatures offers preschoolers an easy introduction to subtraction. Using the picture diagrams, simply cross out the number of sea creatures to be taken away and count how many are left to find the answer to the problems. Preschool Math: Take Away the Sea Creatures will have preschoolers wanting to dive right into subtraction!

Click here to download the worksheet